Weak right side

righthind

Working the right legs – all three of them

I’ve not had much to report, since I’m continuing to slowly recover from problems with my IT band.  My right knee still hurts but I can feel it growing stronger, and most happily, I’m able to do more than perch desperately in two-point, clutching handfuls of mane and gritting my teeth. In retrospect, this downtime has in fact been a bit of a gift – I’ve been doing work on my seat and engaging my core.  I’m finally able to put things back together on Derby, and am reasonably happy with how things are going. 

Through the different tests they put me through at physical therapy to benchmark my progress, I’ve learned that my right side is significantly weaker than my left – probably due to my protecting the leg as the IT band became more and more of a problem over the winter.  Derby’s right side is weaker too -that’s the side the chiro really has to work on, and we know that he has to build up more strength. So working our right legs is very much on the agenda for Derbs and me. 

canterleftThe PT I’m doing for the injury is focusing on strengthening my hips and glutes.  Needless to say, my hips especially are working hard, and the muscles are tight.  I’m not even bothering to try sitting the canter – my seat just isn’t following at the moment.  So when I needed to wake Derby up today, I ended up back in two point and let him roll a bit.  We got solid trot work both directions, and I left the lesson a happy camper. 

Anyway, it’s not terribly much to report, but for us, at the moment, it’s pretty good, given the weaknesses in our right legs.  

 

About Sarah Skerik
Sarah Skerik is an experienced digital marketing executive and strategist with a long track record of success in content marketing, social media, demand generation, event marketing, sales enablement, product management and business development.

One Response to Weak right side

  1. tbdancer says:

    True statement: If you’re “off” on one side, the horse will become “off” on that side too. And vice versa: A horse “off” puts YOU “off.” I am working on rehabbing self and horse (shoulder surgery in ’09, decision by me not to ride in the WRONG saddle–and hoping time off would erase the muscle memory of 10 years in that sorry piece of work, now a new saddle and a horse fresh off his OWN rehab for recurrence of lameness. We’re both “good to go.” Now to get my schedule to where I include time for riding ;o) Continued success in your rehab. Sounds like you’ve got a handle on all you and Derby need to do.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: